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COVID-19 Update

****IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT****After careful consideration, the Liberty Library has decided to close and cancel all programs until further notice. However, we know that with schools closed and people “social distancing,” having books and movies available can go a long way to help make your situation more tolerable. You can view items through our online catalog, but the request has been turned off. You can request it here. You will be able to pick items up on:

  • Thursday:  10:00-4:00  (Due to the Maine State Library  Coronavirus Conversations that have been scheduled for public library directions on Tuesday afternoons, there will no longer be pick-up hours on Tuesdays, but I have extended the hours on Thursday. If this time doesn’t work for you, please don’t hesitate to contact me, and we’ll work something out.)

You will not be allowed to come inside to browse materials. You will only be able to pick-up your requested items. Items can be returned in the Book Drop. Returned items will be wiped down and unavailable to borrow again for several days. If you cannot request online, you can email or call the library 589-3161, and I will do my best to meet your needs.  You can also write a list, put in an envelope, and drop in Book Drop. (Be sure to include your name, library number if you know it, and your phone number.)  Interlibrary loan has been suspended by the state until until April 10, 2020. 

Library computers will not be available but the wi-fi will be on and is accessible from your vehicle outside the library. You have to accept the library’s Acceptable Use policy if the last time you logged-on is greater than 24-hours.  Reminder that you can also download audio and eBooks from Download Library via CloudLibrary. However, I expect there are many others using that service since we share it with other libraries around the state. Additional audiobooks and eBooks were added to CloudLibrary this week. Never hurts to put items on HOLD. And there is always the Little Free Library outside!

Please contact me if you have questions. We want to help! You can help us by staying away if you are sick and remember to wash your hands before handling materials. Keep checking back for updates for when normal service will resume.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/covid-19/

Bicentennial Discussion Group

March 15, 2020 Marks the Bicentennial of Maine’s Statehood!

To learn more about Maine’s history, the library is sponsoring a Bicentennial Discussion Group.
Dates and topics: Check back for updates.

  • CANCELED Tue, March 24, 6:30pm – Were there “two Maines” even before statehood?
  • CANCELED Tue, March 31, 6:30pm – Slavery and Maine/Missouri Compromise
  • Tue, April 7, 6:30pm – Where to draw the border?  Webster-Ashburton Treaty
  • Tue, April 14, 6:30pm – What did Maine statehood mean for Wabanaki sovereignty?
  • Tue, April 21, 6:30pm – What did Liberty and Montville look like in 1820? In 1920?

The first three sessions will be facilitated by Don Schultz, former Social Studies teacher at Mt. View High School. Wabanaki historian Maria Giouard will explore Maine’s history from the many perspectives of its multiple past and current populations during the fourth session. Montville Historical Society and Liberty Historical Society members will assist with the fifth session. The library was given an award from the Maine Bicentennial Commission to hold this program. Attend a single event or attend all.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/bicentennial/

Photography Exhibit

Blueberry Island

Otie Smith has lived in Liberty for 30-years. In 1967, when his daughter was born, “They wanted big dollars to take pictures of her. So I decided to buy a camera and take pictures myself.” His first camera was a Miranda from a designer in Japan, who later went on to design the popular lightweight camera Olympus 01. He still has an Olympus 01. Self-taught, he used to photograph weddings but moved on to taking mostly wildlife photos. Until about 4-years ago, he used solely film but has recently switched to digital photography. Both types are in this exhibit. He enjoys taking photos of the Maine coast, Mt. Katahdin, Acadia National Park, and many locations around the Liberty area. All of Otie’s 8.5 x 11-inch photographs displayed at the library are for sale. Framed are $30. Unframed are $20. Be sure to look through his album of 106 more photographs while you’re visiting.
Thank you to Otie for exhibiting his work at short notice due to unexpected cancellation of the planned student art exhibit.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/art/

March Madness Cribbage Tournament

March 1st ’til Completed   
Playing in the final round:

  • Peter Beckford
  • Isaac Widmer

Due to social distancing, it will take some time before the final round will be played.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/cribbage/

Improve Your Computer Skills for Free

The National Digital Equity Center provides FREE Digital Literacy courses in all Maine counties. Interested in taking a course? Fill out the online survey which helps them determine which courses to offer and where. They will be in touch with you once a course is scheduled. Survey – https://survey.digitalequitycenter.org

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/improve-your-computer-skills-for-free/

Poetry Express

Listen to:

  • Jackie Ascrizzi reading “Starting the Subaru at Five Below” by Stuart Kestenbaum
  • Paul McFarland reading “Nature” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on Sunday, January 5.
  • Leigh Norcott reading reading “Apple” by Betsy Sholl broadcast on Sunday, December 8th.
  • Ellen Taylor reading her own poem “Just Beyond Hope” on December 1st.
  • Barb Rehmeyer reading ” Pearly Everlasting” by Linda Buckmaster broadcast on Sunday, November 10th.
  • John Twomey reading “Ants” by Lynn Ascrizzi broadcast on Sunday, October 27th.

These were broadcast on WERU. The Poetry Express performance was held at the library on September 23rd.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/poetry-express/

Knits & Pieces

Delivered this week:

  • 6 pairs of mittens to Walker School
  • 7 pairs of mittens and 2 hats to Headstart at WaldoCAP
  • 6 hats to Belfast Soup Kitchen
  • Several scarves to Triad to be distributed to senior citizens in Waldo County

Thank you for all the donations!

Cold weather is not over yet this winter. We are still collecting small sized mittens for the Head Start children. See their “thank you” pictures displayed at the library.

Simple 2-needle mittens: 3-4 yrs,  4-6 yrs, & 6-8 yrs.
A simple pattern for hats can be found here. Watch cap pattern.  Bear Hat pattern.

We also collect yarn and needles for Jen Gunderman who delivers these to organizations assisting New Mainers transitioning to life in Maine. They in turn make hats and mittens for other refugees who are in camps awaiting permission to be allowed into other countries to begin making new lives for themselves and their families.

Several knitters are getting together informally to knit (and other crafts) and chat on Wednesday mornings at 10:00 at the library. Anyone is welcome to join them.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/knit/

150 Years Ago

150About 35 years ago, Janet Heslam bought from an antique shop in Brooks four daily journals from October 1864 to October 1871.  It turns out they were written by a man in Montville who farmed, but he also supervised the one room school houses. At the end of the first journal, she found the signature of H. M. Howard. The other journals are not signed. Janet determined the journalist was 27, in 1865, and his daughter Eva died in 1864. Janet decided to transcribe these journals to share in her weekly letters to her grandchildren. She offered to share these transcriptions so they could be posted on the Library webpage for everyone to read. We will post one a month. It will be interesting as we go through the year to compare the daily happenings of a man 150 years ago to the present day. We hope you enjoy!

Continue reading

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/150-years-ago/