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Poetry Express

Monday, Sept. 23, 6:30-8:30pm
Join poet Ellen Taylor at Liberty Library for a Community Poetry Reading exploring themes of small town life, tools, and the natural world.

Poetry Express gathers community members to explore poetry by Maine poets relevant to that town. A featured poet helps participants pick selections and learn how to read poetry; then the program culminates in a community performance. The program is a competitive application program sponsored by the Maine Humanities Council in partnership with Maine State Library. Liberty Library is one of five libraries in the state to be selected this year.

Liberty Library has partnered with Midcoast Conservancy in hosting this Poetry Express event. Twelve readers will share twenty-four poems. Refreshments will be provided.

Sometimes poetry is the only form of language that can express the complexity and depth of our emotions.
~Mary Pipher

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/poetry-express/

Summer Reading

Eighteen children returned their Reading Records to the Liberty Library and “purchased” with their reading points 120 cans of cat food, six 16.5 lb. bags of dog food, 48 packets of wet dog food, and an assortment of treats, dishes, collars, leashes, and toys. All of theses items were donated to the Waldo County Pet Food Pantry. Heidi Blood, director of the Food Pantry, and her dog Cubby were at the library on Saturday, September 7th, to accept the donations. Kids read for at least 30 minutes a day during the summer to earn a point sticker on their Reading Record. All who turned in their records had at least 50 points or more. Pictured at left are a few of the top readers in front of a table piled high with pet food and supplies.

Those who turned in a Reading Record but did not attend the Summer Reading Wrap-Up can pick up their certificates at the library. We chose the pet food for you!

The Summer Reading Program is made possible by Pieceworks, Inc., Back 40 Bakehouse, Liberty East, Lake St. George Brewing Company, and Richard & Mary Vann. 

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/summer-reading2019/

Out on a Limb Apple CSA 

The library purchased a share at the Out On a Limb CSA, and we will “share” the apples with you at five programs in September through November.  At each event, you will be able to sample the apple varieties and sometimes an apple treat.

  • Wed, September 18, 6:30pm
  • Tue, October 1, 6:30pm – John Bunker
  • Wed, October 16, 6:30pm
  • Wed, October 30, 6:30pm
  • Tue, November 12, 6:30pm

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/out-on-a-limb-apple-csa/

Flower Arranging Workshop

Click to enlarge

The bouquets participants made at the Flower Arranging Workshop taught by Debbie Dinsmore on Saturday.  Besides creating these round fall arrangements,  everyone learned to make an armature and a holiday decoration. The workshop was free because we received a Maine Public Library Fund Program Grant. There will be five more workshops scheduled during the year so stay tuned.

Making art is good for the body, mind, and soul.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/flower-arranging-workshop/

Teddy Bear Delight

Click to enlarge.

Carol Sloane will be exhibiting “Teddy Bear Delight” during September. Sloane reveres her “childhood friends,” in a series of images created with oil stick on paper.  “Teddy bears hold our dreams and secrets. . .they are our companions and confidants. . . long may they be so,” says Sloane of this collection. A familiar name in the Mid-coast art scene and beyond, Sloane’s work has been shown in various galleries and museums since the mid-1990’s, including, most recently, her 2018 exhibit “Contemporary Scrolling” at the Maine Jewish Museum, Portland, ME. She lives in Rockland. For more about Sloane’s work see carolsloanemaine.com.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/art/

Knits & Pieces

Even though it’s summer, we will still accept hand knit items to be distributed in the fall, so keep your needles and hands working when you are able through the upcoming months.  Smaller-sized mittens are most appreciated for Head Start and larger-sized ones for the Walker School.  They are so appreciated and keep the hands of our youngest residents warm! Hats, scarves and cowls are most appreciated for older Waldo county residents who are in need, and these are distributed through the Soup Kitchen.  We thank all of you so much for your efforts over the last few years.

Simple 2-needle mittens: 3-4 yrs,  4-6 yrs, & 6-8 yrs.
A simple pattern for hats can be found here. Another Stockinette Watch cap pattern.

We also collect yarn and needles for Jen Gunderman who delivers these to organizations assisting New Mainers transitioning to life in Maine. They in turn make hats and mittens for other refugees who are in camps awaiting permission to be allowed into other countries to begin making new lives for themselves and their families.

Several knitters are getting together informally to knit and chat on Wednesday mornings at 10:00 at the library. Anyone is welcome to join them.

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/knit/

150 Years Ago

150About 35 years ago, Janet Heslam bought from an antique shop in Brooks four daily journals from October 1864 to October 1871.  It turns out they were written by a man in Montville who farmed, but he also supervised the one room school houses. At the end of the first journal, she found the signature of H. M. Howard. The other journals are not signed. Janet determined the journalist was 27, in 1865, and his daughter Eva died in 1864. Janet decided to transcribe these journals to share in her weekly letters to her grandchildren. She offered to share these transcriptions so they could be posted on the Library webpage for everyone to read. We will post one a month. It will be interesting as we go through the year to compare the daily happenings of a man 150 years ago to the present day. We hope you enjoy!

Continue reading

Permanent link to this article: http://liberty.lib.me.us/150-years-ago/